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Virus Removal Tools filter_list
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Virus Removal Tools #1
Greetings everyone,

Here's a few virus removal tools, that are certainly worth keeping on hand. Now they don't replace your current AV, but more so can be used to remove malicious content that your Antivirus failed to detect.
Most are portable editions, meaning there's no Installation required, just execute and you're good to go. They can be run alongside your extsing Antivirus product.
They're from reputable websites, hence no need for online virus scan reports and are available as a freeware download.

Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool: http://www.kaspersky.com/antivirus-removal-tool?form=1
Avira Removal Tool: http://www.softpedia.com/get/Antivirus/A...dows.shtml
Avast Virus Cleaner: http://www.tomsguide.com/us/download/Ava...30775.html
McAfee Stinger: http://www.mcafee.com/us/downloads/free-...inger.aspx
Comodo Cleaning Essentials: https://www.comodo.com/business-security...ntials.php
Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool: http://www.softpedia.com/get/Antivirus/M...Tool.shtml
9-lab Removal Tool: http://www.softpedia.com/get/Antivirus/R...Tool.shtml
Symantec Ramnit Removal Tool: http://www.softpedia.com/get/Antivirus/R...Tool.shtml

Enjoy.
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RE: Virus Removal Tools #2
Thanks for the share brother, these will be very helpful when i'll clean my windows xp server.
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RE: Virus Removal Tools #3
(05-07-2015, 09:35 AM)HentaiOuji Wrote: Thanks for the share brother, these will be very helpful when i'll clean my windows xp server.

You're most welcome.

I'm glad you've found them of benefit.
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RE: Virus Removal Tools #4
(05-07-2015, 09:35 AM)HentaiOuji Wrote: Thanks for the share brother, these will be very helpful when i'll clean my windows xp server.

XP server.... ouch.

Best treatment for that is a bullet to the head lol.

I get it though, gotta work with what you can get Smile Just keep that sucker as updated as possible.
---
Click here to get started with Linux!

If I helped you, please +rep me, apparently we've started over on Rep and I'd like to break 100 again...

Inori Wrote: got clickbaited by roger

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RE: Virus Removal Tools #5
Who's going to pay for this? Use common sense when coming to the internet, also use Virtual Machines and Sandboxie to be safe, also, ALWAYS upload the file to VirusTotal, it will reveal trojans and disrupt the files encryption if encrypted by the author, making a detection obvious for the next person and on.

Also, should've provided cracked releases.

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RE: Virus Removal Tools #6
(05-27-2015, 10:13 PM)Hyper_ Wrote: Who's going to pay for this? Use common sense when coming to the internet, also use Virtual Machines and Sandboxie to be safe, also, ALWAYS upload the file to VirusTotal, it will reveal trojans and disrupt the files encryption if encrypted by the author, making a detection obvious for the next person and on.

Also, should've provided cracked releases.

Read the opening paragraph towards the end:
Quote:and are available as a freeware download.

Pertaining to VMs, they're not fail-safe. A hardware virtualization-based rootkit, can Intercept the hardware calls made from the VM (Guest) to the physical (Host) OS, hence compromise the Virtual Machine. Simply uploading a file to VT to check for Malware, doesn't even touch the surface. If a given malware Is running In Kernel-Mode (Ring 0) with full elevated privileges as a "Diskless malware" (not written to disk), all behavioral (dynamic) analytical approaches are more or less futile.
A memory acquisition will need to be performed for such malware, create a memory dump file and analyze the memory dump thereafter. "Volatility" Is a powerful tool that'll certainly analyze and detect the malicious content.
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[+] 1 user Likes mothered's post
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RE: Virus Removal Tools #7
(05-28-2015, 06:45 AM)mothered Wrote: Read the opening paragraph towards the end:

Pertaining to VMs, they're not fail-safe. A hardware virtualization-based rootkit, can Intercept the hardware calls made from the VM (Guest) to the physical (Host) OS, hence compromise the Virtual Machine. Simply uploading a file to VT to check for Malware, doesn't even touch the surface. If a given malware Is running In Kernel-Mode (Ring 0) with full elevated privileges as a "Diskless malware" (not written to disk), all behavioral (dynamic) analytical approaches are more or less futile.
A memory acquisition will need to be performed for such malware, create a memory dump file and analyze the memory dump thereafter. "Volatility" Is a powerful tool that'll certainly analyze and detect the malicious content.

VMs are rarely targeted by coders, because it isn't a profitable target demographic. Cryptoware is more of a thing now, because if you manage to infect servers, companies will be willing to pay the couple thousand to get their files back ASAP, instead of trying to restore everything via backup files (assuming that it's possible). VMs are still one of the best ways to make sure the majority of malware doesn't cross-over, but obviously it isn't perfect.

There are also special tools like OTL, DDS, RKill, TDSSKiller, etc, which are nice tools, if you know how to use them.

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RE: Virus Removal Tools #8
(05-28-2015, 01:07 PM)Ultimatum Wrote: VMs are rarely targeted by coders, because it isn't a profitable target demographic. Cryptoware is more of a thing now, because if you manage to infect servers, companies will be willing to pay the couple thousand to get their files back ASAP, instead of trying to restore everything via backup files (assuming that it's possible). VMs are still one of the best ways to make sure the majority of malware doesn't cross-over, but obviously it isn't perfect.

There are also special tools like OTL, DDS, RKill, TDSSKiller, etc, which are nice tools, if you know how to use them.

Users test Malware In VMs, and most likely run the VM on the Host OS that contains Important credentials.

It's the Host OS that the authors of the malware target, therefore using the VM as a gateway to compromise the physical system, Is the reason why virtualization-type malware & rootkits exist In a greater capacity.
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RE: Virus Removal Tools #9
No. I mean, creating a piece of malware which passes through a secure VM is very very difficult. Most cases, these are sabotaging malware, and aren't for your bank details, etc.

I'm not saying they don't exist, but it is highly unlikely that you would contract on. There are more people in the world to infect than the ones who are cautious enough to test it out in a VM, and that's where the greatest demographic would be.

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RE: Virus Removal Tools #10
(05-29-2015, 07:08 AM)Ultimatum Wrote: No. I mean, creating a piece of malware which passes through a secure VM is very very difficult. Most cases, these are sabotaging malware, and aren't for your bank details, etc.

I'm not saying they don't exist, but it is highly unlikely that you would contract on. There are more people in the world to infect than the ones who are cautious enough to test it out in a VM, and that's where the greatest demographic would be.

You're missing the point, It's not about coding a piece of malware "dedicated" to VMs and VMs alone.

Any smart malware coder, will cater for numerous exploitation vectors. The more a system Is susceptible to attack, the better, thus a given malware will be open to all avenues of attack. It's like when a keylogger Is coded with all "Antis"- Anti-VM, Anti-Sandboxie, Anti-AV and so forth.
As for compromising a VM, It's not that difficult as many users many think.
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